Nationally, American prisons release more than 650,000 people into society every year. That’s equivalent to the entire population of Memphis or Boston. 

On this edition, producer Aaron Mendelson followed ex-prisoner Kevin Tindall on his journey out of prison.

Special thanks to Claire Schoen and the University of California Berkeley, School of Journalism.

Featuring:   

  • Gordon Brown, ex-prisoner
  • Monta Kevin Tindall, ex-prisoner
  • Jerry Elster, ex-prisoner
  • Tom Gorham, Program Director Options Recovery Services
  • Barry Krisberg, Director of Research and Policy and Lecturer in Residence at Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy, UC Berkeley
  • Debra Mendoza, former parole officer, consultant
Direct download: MakingCon_140730_Ax.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:12 PM

On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Southern Gulf Coast. Drawn by reconstruction work, the number of Latino immigrants has nearly doubled. Reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina drew thousands of people from India, Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, and other Latin American countries.  Workers were charged with pulling dead bodies from abandoned homes and rebuilding New Orleans. But the influx of migrant workers also increased immigration crackdowns.

Making Contact’s Jasmin Lopez follows Jose Monterubio, a reconstruction worker. He tells us about his detention and how he stands for immigrant rights with the support of Congress of Day Laborers. Next, Jose Torres Tama recites Corporate Coyotes Smuggle Immigrant Workers, a poem from his book Immigrant Dreams, Alien Nightmares.

Ten years later after hurricane Katrina, it’s estimated there are nearly 100,000 fewer African Americans living in the city of New Orleans.  Andrew Stelzer visits the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum, to learn how some are trying to preserve the lessons and legacies of the past. And we talk to a resident of one of the ultramodern homes built by Brad Pitt’s Make it Right project.

As a new lower 9th ward emerges, what will it look like and who will be included in the remake?

Featuring:

  • Luis Medina, immigrant reconstruction worker
  • Jose Monterrubio, immigrant reconstruction worker
  • Jose Torres-Tama, artist
  • Robert Green, Lower 9th Ward resident
  • Beck Cooper, Director of the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum
Direct download: KatrinaPodcast.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

It’s something many of us take for granted: access to clean drinking water. But for many Americans it’s not something they can rely on.  From chemical spills in  West Virginia to ecoli in the water on the Texas-Mexico border, to contamination from farming in California. On this edition, we hear what happens when there’s not a drop to drink.

Featuring:

 

  • Angela Walker, Charleston resident
  • Neena Satija, environment reporter Texas Tribune
  • Daisy Gonzalez and Vicente Lara, Environmental Justice Coalition for Water
  • Horacio Amezquita, resident San Jerado
Direct download: Notadroptodrink.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

It’s election season! But since the 2013 Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act, many states have pushed changes to voter laws that raise disturbing connections to the past. On this week’s show, we’ll hear about hard fought battles for voting rights and the implications of new laws.

Featuring:

  • Reverend Tyrone Edwards, civil rights historian in Plaquemines Parish Louisiana
  • Tyrone Brooks, Georgia State Representative
  • Clifford Kuhn, Professor of History at Georgia State University
  • JT Johnson, civil rights organizer
  • Allen Secher, rabbi
  • Jerel James, Tamia Adkinson, docents at Civil Rights Museum of St. Augustine
  • August Tinson, testified in U.S. vs Fox (1962)
  • Gary May, professor of history at the University of Delaware and the author of Bending Towards Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
Direct download: MakingCon_150805_Ax.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

During the Great Recession from 2007 to 2009 millions of people lost their jobs and hustled to survive. Since then, the economy has regained more than 8 million jobs. Still wage growth remains low and many simply can’t find a full time work.

On this edition of Making Contact we’ll hear from a panel of labor experts on the state of labor market especially for part-time and low-wage workers. The Panelists include former New York Times labor reporter Steven Greenhouse, Ann Boger, Director of Government Affairs & Public Policy for the Freelancers Union; Tsedeye Gebreselassie, Senior Staff Attorney for the National Employment Law Project; and Rick McGahey, the first voice you’ll hear. He’s a Professor of Professional Practice and Director of Environmental Policy and Sustainability for The New School for Public Engagement. The moderator is David Gray, Senior Fellow at New America NYC.

Direct download: MakingCon_150729_Pod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

This is a special encore edition.

Renowned biologist Sandra Steingraber has made fighting environmentally induced cancers her lifes work.  Steingraber’s book, Living Downstream, has been turned into a movie chronicling a year in her life trying to create a world free of cancer causing toxics.  On this edition, we hear excerpts of the documentary film, Living Downstream.

 

Special thanks to The People’s Picture Company for allowing us to excerpt the film ‘Living Downstream’.  

 

Direct download: livindownstream.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

From unpaid bills to entire governments facing bankruptcy, debt is never far from our minds or the news. It’s deeply embedded in our lives: our language, culture, even major religions. It’s also at the heart of many of our most pressing political debates. But have you ever thought about where debt comes from? On this edition of Making Contact we hear from Anthropologist David Graeber, author of “Debt: The First 5,000 Years.” Graeber traces the history of debt and asks what might we learn from how societies in the past dealt with it. His 2011 talk was recorded by Allan Campbell, producer of People United at KOOP radio, in Austin Texas and featured on Bread and Roses Radio.

Debt is deeply embedded in our lives: our language, culture, even major religions. It’s also at the heart of many of our most pressing political debates. But have you ever thought about where debt comes from? On this edition of Making Contact we hear from Anthropologist David Graeber, author of “Debt: The First 5,000 Years.” Graeber traces the history of debt and asks what might we learn from how societies in the past dealt with it. His 2011 talk was recorded by Allan Campbell, producer of People United at KOOP radio, in Austin Texas and featured on Bread and Roses Radio.

Direct download: MakingCon_150715_Pod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:00 PM

The female body as medium, and as message.

How can a woman determine how she is perceived by the world, and even by herself?

On this edition, we hear stories of women who are using their bodies for political protest, and as tools of self-empowerment…forcing everyone to reevaluate their perspectives on the female form.

Featuring:

 

  • Neda Topaloski & Xenia Chernyshova, Femen members
  • Galia Ackerman, author of the book “Femen”
  • Catherine KingExecutive Producer, Global Fund for Women
  • Yolando Y'Netta Harbin-Venson, Big Ol Pretty Girls owner
  • Jenny “Diva” Davis, clothing designer Diva’s Exquisite Designs.
Direct download: MakingCon_150708_Pod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:30 AM

When journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates set out to write about police killings he went to visit Mable Jones. Back in 2000, Jones son, a friend of Coates from their time at Howard University, was shot and killed by police in Virginia. He was twenty five years old.

Written in the form of a letter to his own teenage son, Coates' book "Between the World and Me" puts police shootings in a wider context.

Ta-Nehisi Coates spoke as part of the Lannan Foundation's Pursuit of Cultural Freedom Series. 

Direct download: MakingCon_150701_Pod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00 PM

Over 6,000 migrant deaths were recorded on the U.S. side of the border with Mexico between 1998 and 2013. The true number of deaths is likely higher, and thousands of families never hear from their loved ones again.

This documentary travels to the desert ranch lands of Brooks County and the border town of Reynosa, Tamaulipas to introduce us to the human cost of “prevention through deterrence,” a border enforcement strategy introduced during the Clinton administration.

Direct download: MakingCon_150624_Pod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:30 PM



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